Animals

SPECIAL DOGS WITH SUSPECT HIP DYSPLASIA

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Coxofemoral dysplasia better known as hip dysplasia, It is a bone disease that affects many dogs! It can develop either until 5-6 months of age, or in adulthood, and is usually hereditary

One of the basic things you need to know is that it is a degenerative disease, which in advanced stages, can end up incapacitating your pet!

If you have a large or giant breed dog, it will be especially vulnerable., so to avoid this ailment Try to have the right dose of calcium and minerals! They are basic for their rapid growth.

Apart from a deficit of calcium and minerals, there are others factors that enhance canine hip dysplasia, as:

  • Excessive physical exercise
  • Overweight
  • Hormonal alterations

Without forgetting other causes such as:

  • Genetics or hereditary disease
  • Random causes

Do you think your dog may have hip dysplasia? In Wakyma we tell you all about the Symptoms and treatment you can follow to treat hip dysplasia of your dog.

Hip dysplasia in dogs

Hip dysplasia in dogs, consists of a coxofemoral joint malformation (that is, the joint that joins the femur, with the pelvic bone).

This sickness It occurs when during the development of our puppy, the hip does not grow properly, moving to the sides, preventing it from moving correctly. Another aspect to consider is that This ailment gets worse over time!

One of the direct consequences of this disease is that Our pet will feel pain and even lameness, limiting their daily activities.

Dog breeds prone to hip dysplasia

Although hip dysplasia, It can occur in all types of dogs, usually develops in large or giant breeds. That is why in these cases it is especially advisable to meet the needs of our pet in each of its stages (puppy, adult, senior).

Have your dog's parents had hip dysplasia? Quiet! And is that many dogs, although they carry the gene however the disease never develops. Remember to be aware of your pet and offer the nutrition it needs.
The races most likely to develop hip dysplasia are:

Causes of hip dysplasia in dogs

We are not going to cheat you, Hip dysplasia is a complex disease! It can have its cause in both genetic and environmental or hereditary factors.

eye! Although it is a hereditary disease, it is not congenital! Hip dysplasia develops as the dog grows, It is not a disease of birth!

Factors that can enhance the appearance of hip dysplasia in our dog

  • Genetic predisposition: although they have not yet>(Photo via: misanimals)

When hip dysplasia is beginning to develop, Your symptoms are less obvious! However, as your hips deteriorate, the symptoms will be more pronounced.
What are the alarm signals?

  • Inactivity
  • I refuse to play
  • I refuse to climb stairs
  • I refuse to run and jump
  • Limp
  • Difficulty moving the hind legs
  • Movements of "rabbit jump"
  • Rocking
  • Rigidity in the hip
  • Stiffness in the hind legs
  • Hip pain
  • Pelvic pain
  • Atrophy
  • Audible clicks
  • Difficulty getting up
  • Increased shoulder muscles
  • Curved back

Does your dog show one or more of these symptoms? Do not hesitate to go to your trusted veterinarian! He will perform ultrasounds, and he can certify you if your pet really has this ailment.

How does a veterinarian diagnose hip dysplasia?

As we mentioned before, visiting the veterinarian is essential! During the diagnosis, Your veterinarian will feel and move your pet's hip and pelvis. Apart from this, you will also request: an x-ray of the area, blood and urine tests.

With the results of all of the above, it will offer you the diagnosis, of hip dysplasia, or the ailment that your pet is suffering.

eye! Keep in mind that your pet's pain, and difficulty moving, will depend on the degree of inflammation in the joint, not so much of the degree of dysplasia itself.

Treatment of canine hip dysplasia

Dysplasia has no cure, however There are treatments to relieve your pet's pain, and improve their quality of life. What kind of treatments are these? They can be non-surgical, or surgical, depending on the age, size, condition and general health of your dog. Do not hesitate to consult the opinion of your trusted veterinarian!

  • The treatment non surgical, it is usually advised in cases of mild dysplasias, or cases where it cannot be operated. It is usually a treatment with anti-inflammatories, chondroprotectors (or cartilage protectors) and analgesics. It is complemented by the restriction of certain exercises, weight control of your pet, and diet. eye! This type of treatment does not eliminate dysplasia! Alone It stops its development, improving the quality of life of our pet.
  • The treatment surgical, it is usually recommended when non-invasive treatment does not give results, or in cases with severely damaged joints. One of the advantages is that You would not have to maintain a lifelong treatment for your dog. However, it is a surgery with a certain risk, and Some dogs continue to have pain after the intervention.

Always remember Ask your trusted veterinarian for the best treatment for your pet's case, He will be the one who can best advise you about it!

What happens if I DO NOT treat canine hip dysplasia?

If you do not treat your dog's hip dysplasia, he will suffer pain constantly. The best option is to visit your trusted veterinarian, to offer you the most appropriate treatment for your case. With the right treatment, your pet will have a happy and healthy life.

SPECIAL SERVICE HIP DYSPLASIA SURGERY OF LA SALLE VETERINARY HOSPITAL.

Specialist: DR. CARLOS HUELVA

Puppies between 3 and 4 months JPS Juvenile Public Symphiodesis.

Puppies between 6 and 10 months: Triple TPO Pelvic Osteotomy.

Adult Dogs: Implants of Cemented Hip Prosthesis of Zurich.

1) WHAT IS HIP DYSPLASIA?

HIP DYSPLASIA is an inherited, chronic and progressive disease, the result of which is

Final is the deformation of the joint and the appearance of signs of osteoarthritis (image 1).

"DYSPLASIA" means "malformation during development." That is, the hip of these animals will develop abnormally during growth.

It is important that we know that at the time of birth the hip is still without

form, so you still can not talk about a dysplastic dog. What they inherit are the genes responsible for this anomalous development. In short, it is an inherited but not congenital disease.

On how we handle these animals in their first months of life will depend many times the evolution of the disease.

3) HOW CAN I DETECT EARLY, IF MY DOG HAS A HIP DYSPLASIA?

Early detection and preventive treatments will allow us to manage the pathology in the most optimal way possible, thus being able to choose the best performance for each situation.

Many times the disease presents with pain, claudication and lameness, but on other occasions the only thing we note is that our puppy has something less active than normal, and is not very playful. We can also appreciate that it costs him to get in the car, or up and down stairs, etc.

As for the clinical diagnosis, fortunately we have more and more means to detect it at earlier ages.

In fact, 7 markers in the genes have already been located in the farmers, which allows us with a simple blood test to calculate a probability that the dog will develop the disease with 95% reliability.

This test can be performed at any age, even in newborns. The same tests are currently being developed in German Shepherd and Golden Retriever.

In our Center we have the latest diagnostic techniques such as Radiology and Arthroscopy. In addition, we have at our disposal diagnostic centers with MRI and CT for the most exceptional cases.

We have developed protocols that allow us to diagnose the disease more and more early

If our dog enters the predisposed breeds (Labrador, Golden Retriever, German Shepherd, Boxer, Mastiff, St. Bernard, Rottweiller, etc.), we must submit them to studies at very early ages, to try to apply preventive therapies as soon as possible.

4) WHAT ARE THESE STUDIES?

With this method, developed at the University of Pennsylvania, we calculate the probability that the puppy will develop osteoarthrosis at maturity.

By calculating the distraction index (ID), that is, the degree of joint laxity, we can predict quite reliably if our patient will develop hip dysplasia.

It must be done between 12 and 14 weeks of age, maximum up to 16, so it is the earliest radiological method for the diagnosis of the disease. However, it can also be included in studies of older dogs already diagnosed to get an idea of ​​the degree of hip laxity.

The number obtained will be between 0 and 1. Depending on the race, the closer to 1, the more likely to be dysplastic. From 0.3 it is already considered positive.

5) IF YOU DETECT THAT MY DOG HAS DYSPLASIA, DOES IT HAVE A SOLUTION?

It is the most frequent question we ask ourselves when they tell us that our dog has dysplasia. Fortunately enough techniques have been developed in recent years to be able to solve almost 100% of cases of hip dysplasia.

It has gone from being a disease with a serious prognosis to having a favorable prognosis. The purpose is to give the dog a good quality of life without pain, a situation that is followed in most cases. For this, it is essential in each case to choose and apply the most appropriate technique.

6) WHAT IS THE BEST SOLUTION FOR MY DOG?

Everything will depend on the breed, THE AGE and the size of the dog, will also depend on the type and degree of dysplasia, as well as the symptoms that the animal presents. Conservative treatments will be used in asymptomatic dogs, while surgical treatments will be reserved for those animals that present pain, or very young animals with a high degree of dysplasia, because after a certain age, they will no longer be able to perform the indicated surgical technique.

7) WHAT IS CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT?

We must not forget that many of the dysplastic dogs are asymptomatic. We can ensure that this situation is maintained with weight control, moderate exercise and chondroprotective supplements. (In certain cases, REHABILITATION AND PHYSIOTHERAPY is very beneficial).

We must avoid excess exercise and calcium in the diet of these animals during growth. A potentially dysplastic dog can become dysplastic just by not complying with any of these driving lines.

8) IF MY DOG NEEDS A SURGICAL TREATMENT, WHEN SHOULD I DO IT AND WHAT IS IT?

Only those dogs in which preventive therapies have failed and, at a certain age, continue to experience pain, inactivity, intolerance to exercise and obvious lameness, or IN CASE OF VERY YOUNG ANIMALS WITH A HIGH DEGREE OF DISPLASIA, because After a certain age, they will no longer be able to perform the indicated surgical technique.

The key parameters that will mark the type of surgical technique, is the degree of dysplasia and especially the AGE OF THE PUPPY, because after a certain age, when you have completed bone growth, certain surgical techniques cannot be performed.

1.-YOUTH PUBLIC SYMPHYSISESIS (JPS) (Only in puppies of 3 or 4 months of age).

In puppies under 16 weeks with a high distraction rate, we can perform a simple intervention to modify hip growth and achieve optimal stability when growth is complete.

By cauterizing the growth line of the pubic symphysis, we will get the pelvis to "close" as it grows, thus increasing the coverage of the femoral heads. This intervention is aimed at avoiding more aggressive future surgeries.

2.-TRIPLE PELVIC OSTEOTOMY (TPO) (Only in puppies between 6 and 10 months of age).

We will modify the anatomy of the femur or the pelvis to try to give the joints flexibility.

These corrections will be possible until 10 months of age, when the bone has not yet lost the ability to remodel. Beyond this age, the results will be less guaranteed.

Through this technique we will preserve the “original” joint of the dog, controlling in most cases the appearance of osteoarthritis.

9) IS THE POSTOPERATIVE VERY COMPLICATED?

In any of the Surgical Resolutions, the controlled postoperative period is very important

We must be careful and avoid accidents that put the good evolution of the surgery at risk. It will consist in preventing the dog from running, jumping and playing. We will take our pet on a leash, and the walks will be as long as the surgeon tells us. This situation will continue until the animal can be finally discharged.

The postoperative ones in these interventions usually last about 8-12 weeks.

A POSTOPERATIVE EVIL MAY BE RESPONSIBLE FOR A SURGICAL FAILURE. IN CASE OF HAVING TO REINTERVENATE THE GUARANTEE OF SUCCESS, IT WILL BE MUCH LOWER.

What is hip dysplasia?

When we walk, the bone of the leg and that of the hip fit together and coincide, as if it were a puzzle. But nevertheless, when there is a dysplasia what happens is that the head of the femur does not fit well with the cotyloid cavity, which is the hollow of the hip. Thus, the dog will soon have trouble walking well, and his mood will decrease as time goes by.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptoms are as follows:

  • Trouble walking correctly on its 4 legs.
  • Spend a lot of time resting.
  • He loses interest in things he loved before, like the game or the rides.
  • When standing, the hind legs keep them close together.
  • He gets up, lies down and walks slowly.

Any of these symptoms may appear soon, between the first 3 and 7 months of the puppy's life. Although you must always be alert as they could appear later, with 7 years or more.

Treatment for hip dysplasia

If you suspect that your dog has hip dysplasia it is important that you take it to the veterinarian as soon as possible so that they can give you the most appropriate treatment for your case, which It may consist of administering anti-inflammatories, putting on an orthopedic corrector or even recommending you to use a wheelchair for dogs With which you can walk without having to overload your affected hip.

Thus, you can lead a long and happy life 🙂.

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